Side effects of statin drugs

Side effects of statin drugs

I keep getting notes from men who are taking statin drugs despite the evidence that it is a bad idea.

Statins lower cholesterol, and lowering cholesterol itself is a bad idea.

Cholesterol turns into all the other sex hormones and steroid hormones that we need for health.

This includes testosterone, DHT, cortisol, and a host of others.

If you take the statin drugs, you are interfering with the creation of sex hormones.

Do you really want to do that?

I believe that statin drugs are the biggest mockery of modern medicine.

Doctors and patients are the butts of the Big Joke.

And Big Pharma is ready with the punchline.

The drug companies have sold over $100 billion of these dangerous chemicals.

But what gets me is how so many men are still taking them.

And they’re taking them despite the evidence statins are harmful and dangerous!!

So let me try once again to convince you to talk to your doctor about getting off of statin drugs.

Let me also add my obligatory disclaimer that studies like the one I’m showing you now are not the greatest.

This is a meta-analysis, and it’s made up of other studies.

This type of study can easily be biased for or against a particular theory.

In this case, I think the study is very sound.

I like this one because the bias in the study is for the statin drugs being shown to be effective.

The researchers expected to prove that statins are GOOD.

However, the study shows that they are NOT.

If anything, statins are probably far worse than the study shows.

But doctors are paid huge amounts of money to promote statin drugs.

You can’t get away from honorariums, incentives, sales pitches, all kinds of consulting fees and biases.

These are used by the enormously profitable statin business to pay doctors who often prescribe statins.

But, despite all that graft and bribery, this study still shows that statins are a bad idea.

At this juncture, I want to point out a huge statistical trick that the drug companies use today.

They love to talk about how statins lower cardiovascular disease mortality.

The risk of dying from heart disease is lower with statins perhaps.

But what they don’t like to do is talk about what’s most important.

The most important statistic is all cause mortality.

You don’t really care what your cause of death will be.

You just don’t want to die soon.

And you want to die a long, long time from now.

So, all cause mortality is something that you want as low as possible.

Now, autopsies and causes of death can be biased.

They can even be subject to outright fraud for that matter.

But if someone’s dead — they’re dead.

It’s much easier and cleaner to look at studies of drugs like statins over time.

It’s necessary to look at them against how many deaths do they prevent over a specified period.

You can’t fudge all-cause mortality.

You can’t lie about a patient who just died.

The reason he died is important because it can be gamed.

What’s important is that he’s dead.

All-cause mortality is all that matters.

So, today’s study is a study of studies.

The total population of the study is almost 25,000 men.

The researchers looked at these men over a period of years.

And they looked at if these men were on statin drugs or not, as well as if they died or not.

Mortality from coronary heart disease tended to be lower in men receiving interventions to reduce cholesterol concentrations compared with mortality in control subjects.

This is what I’ve been telling you.

Statin drugs may indeed lower death from coronary heart disease.

At least a small amount.

But remember, it’s all-cause mortality that matters.

To put it another way, let’s say your house is on fire.

The fire department comes out and chops big holes in the roof, they demolished the walls, and they put the fire out.

Your house is destroyed.

But the fire department put the fire out.

Your house is still a complete loss.

What really counts is whether they saved your house or not — in this case they destroyed it.

That’s how it is with statins.

What really counts is whether you survive, not what caused your death.

So here is the conclusion of the study authors:

there was a significant increase in deaths not related to illness in groups receiving treatment to lower cholesterol.

What that means is that researchers found that people on statins died in higher numbers than those not on statins.

These were people with similar medical situations — the only significant difference was if they were or were not taking statins.

And there was a significant INCREASE in the number of deaths of people receiving statin drugs.

Now, they did not necessarily die of heart disease, but they sure died of something.

I cannot repeat enough that more people died taking statins than those who did not take statins.

This is why statin drugs are such a bad idea.

They actually CAUSE more people to die sooner than they would if they did not take the drug.

There is virtually no example I can think of where statin drugs are warranted.

But again, I’m just looking at the studies.

I’m not a doctor, and I’m certainly not your doctor.

I’m hopelessly unqualified to give any medical advice.

But I can show you the facts that are available, and YOU can take them to your doctor.

And you want your doctor to take you OFF of statins.

Now, are you going to ask your doctor to get off of statins?

 

 


Matt Cook is editor-in-chief of Daily Medical Discoveries. Matt has been a full time health researcher for 26 years. ABC News interviewed Matt on sexual health issues not long ago. Matt is widely quoted on over 1,000,000 websites. He has over 300,000 daily newsletter readers. Daily Medical Discoveries finds hidden, buried or ignored medical studies through the lens of 100 years of proven science. Matt heads up the editorial team of scientists and health researchers. Each discovery is based upon primary studies from peer reviewed science sources following the Daily Medical Discoveries 7 Step Process to ensure accuracy.
Research Article 
Lowering cholesterol concentrations and mortality: a quantitative review of primary prevention trials 
http://www.bmj.com/content/301/6747/309.short 

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