One year, one $18 bag, one satisfied wife or girlfriend

One year, one $18 bag, one satisfied wife or girlfriend


Are you taking enough of this powder? Many men are not getting enough of it from their food to keep their testosterone nice and high…

—–Important message—-

Order this at Wendy’s next time you want a T boost

Certain items in a Wendy’s, McDonald’s or any other fast food joint contain lots of stearic acid.

Stearic acid is one of today’s huge male miracles. Here’s why…

It fights the aging process.

When we age, everything slows down, our metabolism slows down, and we may suffer from erectile dysfunction.

But when you consume stearic acid, it goes to work increasing the testicles’ production of testosterone.

It also raises metabolism and helps reverse the aging clock.

Stearic acid even shrinks fat cells.

So now when I’m out and about and want a T boost, I head to the nearest fast food burger place and order this…

And if I want to make this T boost permanent, I just do a simple 45-second activity once I’m home from my meal.

This stearic acid trick is a part of this new protocol.

Click to read more about the new protocol to raise T and lower fat (including the 45-second activity)

———-

One year, one $18 bag, one satisfied wife or girlfriend

Testosterone is one of the two most important male sex hormones.

Testosterone is largely responsible for muscle mass. And it’s critical for fertility and optimal sexual function.

But it seems to drop off with age.

And lower testosterone is associated with chronic diseases such as diabetes.

A number of animal experiments show that the supplement taurine can protect testosterone levels as we age.

Supplemental taurine boosted testosterone and sexual function in older animals.

These researchers conducted their study at the College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shenyang Agricultural University, China and published their results in the Journal of Amino Acids.

“Taurine was administered to male rats by tap water.”

While investigating the effect of different compounds on animal reproduction, the scientists discovered that taurine boosts testosterone.

“The results showed that taurine obviously stimulated the secretion of testosterone.”

Sometimes when testosterone is increased via supplements, estrogen also increases.

And an increase in estrogen would mitigate any benefit from testosterone.

Luckily, taurine does not seem to increase estrogen.

“Taurine showed no significant effect on the secretion of estrogen.”

At the optimal dose, taurine increased testosterone by 60%.

However, very high doses of taurine tended to lower testosterone.

The same lab conducted a follow-up study and published it in the Journal of Biomedical Sciences.

This study took a more detailed look at the effect of taurine on testosterone.

The time the scientists set out to see the effect of taurine on rats of different ages.

They gave different groups of rats either taurine or a taurine transport blocker.

“Taurine and a taurine transport inhibitor were offered in water to male rats of different ages.”

They used the taurine transport blocker because taurine can be delivered to the testicles or synthesized in the testicles.

This blocker allowed the researchers to more accurately assess the effect of taurine supplementation.

They looked at sex hormones (including testosterone) and markers of fertility.

“The effects of taurine on reproductive hormones, testis marker enzymes, and sperm quality were investigated.”

This study replicated the findings of the previous experiments.

Again, taurine significantly increased testosterone.

“The levels of T were obviously increased by taurine supplementation in rats of different ages.”

Sperm analysis revealed a significant uptick in markers of fertility from taurine supplementation.

“The motility of sperm was obviously increased by taurine supplement in adult rats.”

Sperm was more abundant and healthier after taurine supplementation.

“The numbers and motility of spermatozoa and the rate of live spermatozoa were significantly increased by taurine supplement in aged rats.”

The researchers looked at the effect taurine has on animals of different ages. And they found out that taurine is even more protective in older animals.

“The results imply that taurine plays important roles in male reproduction – especially in aged animals.”

But how do these results play out in the real world?

Well, that same lab conducted another study that looked into the mating ability of older rats given taurine. They published their results in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology.

Here is the gist of this one…

The testicles produce taurine.

But taurine production declines with age – as does sexual function.

“Taurine concentration will reduce with aging – and aging will result in a significant decline in sexual response and function.”

So the study set out to see if taurine could protect sexual function in aging animals.

“The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of taurine on male sexuality in rats.”

The researchers gave taurine was to the animals in their drinking water – just as in the other studies.

The study looked at a dozen different indicators of sexual function in the animals.

The results showed that taurine improves sexual function in aging animals – through multiple mechanisms.

“Taurine can enhance mating ability in aged male rats by increasing the T levels and through other unknown mechanisms.”

Unfortunately, it seems that there have been no proper follow-up human studies yet.

So the proper dose of taurine for humans with low T or sexual problems is unknown.

Up to 1.5 g of taurine per day is generally considered safe.

A couple of human studies on taurine have shown that up to 6 g per day doesn’t cause problems. 

Sea scallop is a very good dietary source of taurine.

You should consult a healthcare professional to diagnose and treat health problems.

—-Important Message—-

Remember: Taurine is an amino acid that raises testosterone, heals your liver, and gets rid of erection problems

You can get a year’s supply of taurine for $18.

Taurine is safe, effective, and natural. You can get it from shrimp and seafood, but you can get a lot more of it in an $18 bag that lasts a year.

You may want to get taurine for these reasons:

  • Taurine may stop hair loss.
  • Taurine lowers harmful nitric oxide levels. That makes your arteries wider and more relaxed, which increases blood flow to the penis and testicles.
  • Taurine can raise metabolism. Studies show rats and mice and humans consuming taurine are generally more youthful in their metabolic markers.

Taurine is one supplement you may want to increase.

The original recipe Red Bull (sold in the dark purple cans) contains 1 gm of taurine.

So you may want to get taurine from a supplement – or consume more shrimp and seafood.

I put together this report showing you how you can boost your metabolism and regain your youth.

And it shows you how to get back your teenaged erections, any time.

Please see the report – feel free to spend as much time as you want on it, as I think you will really enjoy it.

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Matt Cook is editor-in-chief of Daily Medical Discoveries. Matt has been a full time health researcher for 26 years. ABC News interviewed Matt on sexual health issues not long ago. Matt is widely quoted on over 1,000,000 websites. He has over 300,000 daily newsletter readers. Daily Medical Discoveries finds hidden, buried or ignored medical studies through the lens of 100 years of proven science. Matt heads up the editorial team of scientists and health researchers. Each discovery is based upon primary studies from peer reviewed science sources following the Daily Medical Discoveries 7 Step Process to ensure accuracy.
CSD mRNA expression in rat testis and the effect of taurine on testosterone secretion. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19921479 

Effects of taurine on male reproduction in rats of different ages. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20804629 

Taurine enhances the sexual response and mating ability in aged male rats. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23392896 

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