Inosine a natural antidepressant

Inosine a natural antidepressant

Today’s newsletter is about inosine.

This natural compound in the body may be the key to treating several mental health issues.

And it may be a natural remedy for erectile dysfunction!

Either on its own or with thiamine, it can help with issues like brain clarity, thinking, anxiety, depression, bipolar… and maybe more!

Inosine has the potential to help fix depression and anxiety.

And it’s always great to have alternatives to antidepressants which can have side effects.

Not only is it found naturally in the body, but you can also find it in various foods.

And you can easily obtain inosine capsules online and try this yourself.

So here’s today’s study about inosine.

Researchers split mice into two groups.

One group received inosine supplementation, and the other did not.

Then the researchers stressed out these mice.

They stressed them out big time — over months.

The researchers discovered that the mice who had inosine dealt with the stress better.

These mice were much less stressed out by all of the trials and tribulations imposed on them by the researchers.

Inosine didn’t help any mouse have more endurance or greater ability to exercise.

But inosine helped the mice become resistant to the stress imposed on them.

Oral administration of inosine has the potential to prevent depressive disorder.

I’m supplementing with inosine right now as I write this newsletter.

I have also taken a bit of thiamine.

I find that 500 mg of inosine and 500 mg of thiamine make it very easy for me to focus, concentrate, and clarify my thinking.

You may recognize thiamine as one of the miracle B vitamins, in this case, vitamin B-1.

I find that thiamine and inosine seem to work synergistically together.

And they are effective natural anti-depressants.

So you can take them even if you are not depressed or anxious, just to study better or enjoy clearer thinking.

I’m not sure if you have to take a break from the inosine now and then or not.

I don’t take it every day.

But you can experiment with it.

Like any supplement, make sure you check with your doctor first.

And there are other benefits of inosine.

Inosine also seems to suppress inflammation and help endothelial cells during shock after an injury or food poisoning.

Inosine has organ protective effects during shock. A significant portion of its protective action is maintained even in the post-treatment scenario.

The positive anti-inflammatory effects of inosine seem to be quite lasting.

Also, remember that endothelial cells line the blood vessels and the line the erection chambers in the penis.

Many men who have sexual problems have what researchers call “endothelial dysfunction.”

Inosine lowers inflammation in these endothelial cells.

So it may help reverse erectile dysfunction caused by inadequate blood flow or penile fibrosis.

It works because it helps to transport adenosine, which is often poor in men with ED.

For these reasons and many others, you may want to try some inosine — with your doctor’s consent.

500mg to 1000mg per day seems to be useful, and you should take it with food.

 

 


Matt Cook is editor-in-chief of Daily Medical Discoveries. Matt has been a full time health researcher for 26 years. ABC News interviewed Matt on sexual health issues not long ago. Matt is widely quoted on over 1,000,000 websites. He has over 300,000 daily newsletter readers. Daily Medical Discoveries finds hidden, buried or ignored medical studies through the lens of 100 years of proven science. Matt heads up the editorial team of scientists and health researchers. Each discovery is based upon primary studies from peer reviewed science sources following the Daily Medical Discoveries 7 Step Process to ensure accuracy.
Oral administration of inosine produces antidepressant-like effects in mice 
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep04199 

Inosine improves gut permeability and vascular reactivity in endotoxic shock 
http://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal/Abstract/2001/04000/Inosine_improves_gut_permeability_and_vascular.1.aspx 

Corpus Cavernosum from Men with Vasculogenic Impotence Is Partially Resistant to Adenosine Relaxation due to Endothelial A2B Receptor Dysfunction 
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/319/1/405.short 

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