Don’t read this if you’re squeamish

This is fascinating — but a little gross

—-Important Message—-

I was always jealous of my wife…

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…because women can have virtually endless pleasure it seems!

When I was dating, some of the girls were scary in their sexual appetites and capabilities…

But what about men?

Are we basically doomed to only having our one O per night, and then experiencing the refractory period…

…the period where we can’t get it up, and then the longer term hangover of days or weeks?

I have studied this for many years and I think I have finally found a very easy way for a man to have virtually endless sexual pleasure for hours at a time…

And the man goes from the “one and done” routine, perhaps edging to adult material…

…to always living life at a huge erotic point, where he feels remarkably powerful and sexual all day, all night — every day, every night.

And testosterone levels explode to the upside.

Women start coming onto the man like never before…they can smell a man who is oozing sexuality this way…

Doesn’t this sound like fun? Well read on and I’ll tell you how to get there…

———-

Don’t read this if you’re squeamish

Today, I’m going to talk about a study that is kind of gross – fecal transplants.

Yep. They are exactly what they sound like – transplanting poop from one organism to another.

If you’re squeamish, then you might want to skip this particular email.

It gets a little gross.

OK… now that we got that out of the way…

I want to go over this fascinating study that shows just how important having the right kinds of “microbiota” in your gut actually is to having good health.

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Your microbiota or microbiome is a fancy way of talking about the bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses that colonize your gut.

Picture a bustling city on a weekday morning, the sidewalks flooded with people rushing to get to work or to appointments. Now imagine this at a microscopic level and you have an idea of what the microbiome looks like inside our bodies, consisting of trillions of microorganisms (also called microbiota or microbes) of thousands of different species. [1] These include not only bacteria but fungi, parasites, and viruses.

Researchers are discovering that more and more of your health is affected by your microbiome…

…and that when your microbiome is off it can cause major health issues.

But if you restore your microbiome then you can also start to restore your health.

In the study that I’m going to show you today, scientists used mice who can’t kill certain bad strains of bacteria in their guts.

The same team, led by Sahar El Aidy, associate professor of Microbiology at the University of Groningen recently described how the composition of gut microbes had changed in these knock-out mice and that signs of inflammation of the intestines were visible.

These mice have inflamed bowels, similar to what humans experience with IBS – inflammatory bowel disease.

These mice that had the inflamed guts were given poop transplants from wild mice.

What happened after the transplant was that their guts started to look like the wild mice guts instead of being inflamed…

…and they started to function more normally.

‘The results showed that the composition had shifted towards that of the donor, which means that the faecal transplants were successful.’ Analysis of the metabolites inside the gut showed that the production of short-chain fatty acids, molecules that affect the function of the gut, was reduced in the knock-out mice. ‘This was largely restored by the faecal transplant from wild-type mice,’ says El Aidy.

These mice that received the fecal transplants had lower levels of leaky gut and lower levels of fibrosis in their guts.

These are both extremely positive health outcomes that show that the fecal transplant was successful.

‘Our experiments showed that the epithelial permeability of the intestines, which is higher in the knock-out mice, is restored by the faecal transplant. Also, the extent of fibrosis resulting from inflammation was reduced.’

Now… the point here isn’t that humans should get poop transplants.

Most people find that to be extremely gross.

The point is that if you can fix the microbiome in the gut, then your body can do a much better job of healing itself…

Especially with gut-centered conditions.

There are a lot of ways to take care of your gut, including eating some raw carrots on a daily basis.

It’s something that I pay close attention to and if you want great health, it’s something you should pay attention to as well.

—-Important Message About Your Gut—-

Inflammation in your gut causes a limp member — doing this fixes the gut and fixes rockiness

Diabetes, high blood pressure, low testosterone, belly fat, erections problems, even cancer — all start from uncontrolled inflammation.

And you know what causes this widespread inflammation in the body?

High estrogen levels.

Estrogen is like poison for men. It inflames the cells.

So if we can lower estrogen, we can lower inflammation and start to see positive health effects, almost instantaneously.

So how do you lower estrogen and lower widespread inflammation in the gut, the penis, and all your other organs?

Free today: Try my brand new gut protocol that naturally lowers estrogen and rids the body of inflammation forever

———-


Matt Cook is editor-in-chief of Daily Medical Discoveries. Matt has been a full time health researcher for 26 years. ABC News interviewed Matt on sexual health issues not long ago. Matt is widely quoted on over 1,000,000 websites. He has over 300,000 daily newsletter readers. Daily Medical Discoveries finds hidden, buried or ignored medical studies through the lens of 100 years of proven science. Matt heads up the editorial team of scientists and health researchers. Each discovery is based upon primary studies from peer reviewed science sources following the doxycycline used for to ensure accuracy.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/06/220603124832.htmhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19490976.2022.2081476https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/microbiome/