Does taking aspirin increase your risk of brain hemorrhaging?

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Here’s what you need to know…

Story-At-a-Glance

Matt Cook here, and I recommend aspirin a lot.

But there are those who say that frequent aspirin use increases the risk of bleeding in the brain, or brain hemorrhaging.

So I decided to start digging and see if this is true or not.

And here’s what I found…

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Does taking aspirin increase your risk of brain hemorrhaging?

Aspirin has been around for over 100 years and is one of the most studied substances in the history of medicine.

Aspirin can lower the risk of cancer, it can improve Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s symptoms.

Many people use low-dose aspirin to lower the risk of cardiovascular problems.

But of course every medicine comes with risks.

One of the major concerns about aspirin is the increased risk of bleeding in the brain.

In the last few years, there have been numerous alarming articles claiming that aspirin could increase the risk of brain hemorrhage.

A recent trial, published in one of the world’s top medical journals, has found that this is not the case.

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This human research was carried out by scientists at over 100 hospitals in the United Kingdom. The results were published in The Lancet.

Aspirin belongs to a group of treatments called antiplatelet therapies.

These medicines are suspected to increase the risk of brain hemorrhage.

“Antiplatelet therapy might increase the risk of intracranial haemorrhage.”

The research analysed information from over 100 hospitals in the United Kingdom. 

They looked at medical records of people taking antiplatelet treatments like aspirin who had experienced a brain hemorrhage.

Some people stopped their antiplatelet treatments immediately.

Other people continue taking antiplatelet treatments like aspirin after brain hemorrhage.

The researchers looked at the risk of developing another brain hemorrhage.

“We aimed to estimate the relative and absolute effects of antiplatelet therapy on recurrent intracerebral haemorrhage and whether this risk might exceed any reduction of occlusive vascular events.”

The researchers analyzed the medical records for five years after the initial brain hemorrhage. 

They calculated the difference in risk of a second brain haemorrhage for people taking antiplatelet treatments like aspirin against those who ceased taking the treatments.

The database contained information on over 500 people collected over an 18 year period.

There were a similar number of people in both groups — continuing versus discontinuing antiplatelet treatments.

“536 participants were recruited after intracerebral haemorrhage onset: 268 were assigned to start and 268 to avoid antiplatelet therapy.”

The researchers found the opposite of what they expected.

Patients taking antiplatelet treatments like aspirin were less likely to experience another brain hemorrhage.

Brain bleeds were almost twice as common in people who did not take treatments like aspirin.

23 of the patients who avoided antiplatelet treatments had another brain hemorrhage.

“Recurrence of intracerebral haemorrhage compared with 23 (9%) of 268 participants allocated to avoid antiplatelet therapy.”

But only 12 of those taking antiplatelet treatment had another brain hemorrhage.

“12 of 268 participants allocated to antiplatelet therapy had recurrence of intracerebral haemorrhage.”

Internal bleeding was slightly more common in people who did not take antiplatelet treatments like aspirin.

“18 participants allocated to antiplatelet therapy experienced major haemorrhagic events compared with 25 participants allocated to avoid antiplatelet therapy.”

The study combined analysis of a number of different treatments classed as anti-platelet. 

Aspirin was the most commonly used treatment in the study.

“Half of the participants were taking aspirin, about a quarter clopidogrel, and approximately one-fifth oral anticoagulation ‘treatments.’”

The researchers believe the study reinforces the safety of aspirin and other antiplatelet treatments regarding brain hemorrhage.

“We excluded all but a very modest increase in the risk of recurrent intracerebral haemorrhage with antiplatelet therapy.”

The research confirms the benefits of aspirin in the prevention of vascular events.

“The risk of recurrent intracerebral haemorrhage with antiplatelet therapy seems too small to exceed the established benefits of antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of major vascular events.”

You should always consult a healthcare professional about treating and diagnosing health problems.

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Matt Cook is editor-in-chief of Daily Medical Discoveries. Matt has been a full time health researcher for 26 years. ABC News interviewed Matt on sexual health issues not long ago. Matt is widely quoted on over 1,000,000 websites. He has over 300,000 daily newsletter readers. Daily Medical Discoveries finds hidden, buried or ignored medical studies through the lens of 100 years of proven science. Matt heads up the editorial team of scientists and health researchers. Each discovery is based upon primary studies from peer reviewed science sources following the using cialis to ensure accuracy.

 

Effects of antiplatelet therapy after stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage (RESTART): a randomised, open-label trial

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