Does Keto have nightmarish consequences for men?

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Millions of men are developing diabetic insulin resistance from keto dieting – and here’s why…

——-Important Message——-

Ketogenic diet – should you be on a keto diet?

Many of my students are asking about “keto” or “ketogenic” low-carb diets. They are very trendy right now.

Meanwhile, millions of men are developing diabetic insulin resistance from keto dieting and here’s why.

Low-carb keto diets damage the pancreas beta cells and can induce diabetic symptoms.

My diabetic special report shows you how you can eat-high carb foods and reverse your diabetes.

It works on proven science that Big Pharma prays you never see – they have no desire to help you reverse your diabetes. They are only interested in your buying more treatments.

One of my many students wrote in recently:

See this special report on how to reverse diabetes without low-carb diets…

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Does Keto have nightmarish consequences for men?

Lately, there’s been a huge fad where people eat tons and tons of meat and fat and almost nothing else.

Sometimes these diets have a lot of meat in them – sometimes mostly fat…

Either way, these high-fat diets are absolutely terrible for you.

Which is one thing that I am in agreement with doctors about.

As with most other “diets,” you can lose weight by eating this way…

But it can have some pretty long-term health consequences.

Not just for you, but also for the people you pass your genes on to – your kids and your grandchildren.

That’s because a high-fat diet seems to slip certain genetic switches (called epigenetics).

And even if it doesn’t affect you directly, it might affect your offspring.

It’s a bit mind-blowing.

This study was done by BioMed Central and published in Translational Psychiatry.

The study used female mice, but there is evidence that epigenetic changes can be passed on through sperm as well – so I wouldn’t rule out the same effect for males.

The experimenters wanted to see what effect a high-fat diet would have generationally.

They also wanted to know if it would change the metabolism of subsequent generations of mice.

And It did change their metabolism.

But it had another profound effect as well.

The high-fat diet caused addictive behavior in the offspring.

Yep. Crazy as it sounds, it didn’t just change the metabolism of the mice offspring – it ALSO changed their likelihood of engaging in addictive behavior.

“Researchers at ETH Zurich, Switzerland showed that second generation offspring – grandchildren of mice that had consumed a high-fat diet before, during, and after pregnancy – showed addictive-like behaviors such as increased sensitivity and preference for drugs…as well as characteristics of obesity including changes in their metabolism.”

This epigenetic effect didn’t just stop with the second generation though.

But, strangely… in the third generation, the effects were split between gender.

“In third generation offspring (the great-grandchildren) [we] observed differences between males and females, with only females showing addictive-like behaviors and only males showing obesity characteristics.”

Here’s an even crazier thing about this study…

The original generation of mice didn’t always become obese because of their high-fat diet.

But even if they avoided it, their offspring did become obese.

It’s absolutely amazing how our behavior can affect our children’s genetics even if it doesn’t directly affect us.

“This was the case although the original female mice themselves never became obese and although none of the following generations consumed a high-fat diet.”

And this generational transmission effect is not just limited to the females.

“The authors investigated these effects specifically for transmission via male offspring up until, and including, the third generation.”

The scientists aren’t sure yet what molecular mechanism or what specific epigenetic mechanism causes these changes in the genome of the offspring.

But it’s remarkable that the genetics can change so much due to lifestyle factors that they can be passed down from generation to generation.

With all of that, it’s probably a good idea to stay away from high-fat diets.

Stay away from high-fat diets – eat this way instead.

I’m going to fly in the face of conventional wisdom here and say that it’s a good idea to have only a small amount of fat in your diet.

You do need some fat, because it’s important for some of your body functions.

But you don’t need a lot.

Instead, it’s a good idea to eat a diet with a whole lot of fruits and white starches.

This is where people normally don’t believe me.

But white bread and white rice are good for you as part of a diet that contains lean meat and plenty of fruit.

Remember, for centuries people all over the world have been eating these foods as part of their traditional diets…

These are populations with very low rates of metabolic disorders and diabetes.

But, the bottom line is, whatever you do, don’t eat a diet that’s high in fat.

You can create changes in your genetics that get passed down from generation to generation.

Crazy, but true.

—-Important message—–

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Transgenerational transmission of hedonic behaviors and metabolic phenotypes induced by maternal overnutrition 
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41398-018-0243-2 

Effects of a high-fat diet may be passed on for three generations 
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181012082710.htm