“Creatine Loading” – Should You Do It?

“Creatine Loading” -- Should You Do It?


Breakthrough studies out of South Africa show shocking new benefits to taking creatine this way… Here’s what you need to know…

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“Creatine Loading” – Should You Do It?

Creatine is one of the most well-known sports supplements.

Unlike most supplements, there are a huge number of studies showing the benefits of creatine.

Some of the benefits of creatine are by way of increasing male hormones.

Creatine increases DHT…

And that is the hormone that’s responsible for most masculine traits.

Here is a study about it, and, surprisingly, there was no negative effect on testosterone. (DHT is made from testosterone.)

Three weeks of creatine monohydrate supplementation affects dihydrotestosterone to testosterone ratio in college-aged rugby players.

These researchers did their human study at Stellenbosch University in South Africa and published their results in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.

Male hormones are categorized as androgens.

This study looked at what happens with androgens after three weeks of creatine supplementation.

“This study investigated resting concentrations of selected androgens after three weeks of creatine supplementation in male rugby players.”

The study recruited young male rugby players…

These are people who should have high testosterone and high DHT to start with.

“20 college-aged rugby players volunteered for the study, which took place during the competitive season.”

In sports supplementation, the usual dose of creatine is 5 gm per day.

However, higher doses can be used to get creatine levels up quickly.

The study began with high-dose creatine supplementation for one week – they call this “creatine loading.”

Some study participants got creatine. Another group was given an inactive sugar placebo.

“Subjects loaded with creatine (25 g/day creatine or placebo for seven days.”

In weeks two and three, the creatine group got a normal dose of 5 gm per day while the other group continued with the sugar placebo.

The researchers tested testosterone and DHT before the experiment began – and again after week one and week three of creatine supplementations.

“Testosterone and DHT were measured and ratio calculated at baseline and after 7 days and 21 days of creatine supplementation (or placebo).”

Testosterone remained stable throughout the experiment.

“After 7 days of creatine loading, or a further 14 days of creatine maintenance dose, serum testosterone levels did not change.”

But 25 gm of creatine supplementation led to a massive increase in the masculine hormone DHT.

“DHT increased by 56% after 7 days of 25 gm creatine loading.”

And the 5 gm maintenance dose of creatine kept DHT significantly elevated.

“DHT remained 40% above baseline after 14 days with 5 gm maintenance.”

The researchers were surprised that creatine could boost DHT this much.

DHT is made from testosterone.

“Creatine supplementation may, in part, act through an increased rate of conversion of T to DHT.”

Often an increase in DHT leads to lower testosterone.

This increase in DHT without lowering testosterone was very surprising.

There are many benefits to increased DHT.

  • DHT acts against estrogen. Estrogen is feminizing and inflammatory. Many chronic diseases are associated with higher levels of estrogenic activity.
    • It blocks the effect of estrogen.
    • It decreases the production of estrogen by lowering an enzyme called aromatase that creates estrogen from testosterone.
  • DHT is also crucial for sexual performance. This fact has been established by many trials of DHT-blocking drugs.
  • It seems that DHT is critical for mental health in men. DHT-blocking drugs cause depression and anxiety in men.
  • Some research has indicated that DHT may be more important than testosterone for building muscle. It may turn out that testosterone’s main function is for the production of DHT.

There is a lot of research into the effect of creatine on sports performance.

It increases power and increases lean muscle mass and endurance.

At least some of the benefits of creatine seem to be related to an increase in DHT.

The simplest form of creatine (creatine monohydrate) is safe for most people.

However, creatine may be a problem for people who have weak kidneys.

You should always consult a healthcare practitioner about treating and diagnosing health-related problems.

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Matt Cook is editor-in-chief of Daily Medical Discoveries. Matt has been a full time health researcher for 26 years. ABC News interviewed Matt on sexual health issues not long ago. Matt is widely quoted on over 1,000,000 websites. He has over 300,000 daily newsletter readers. Daily Medical Discoveries finds hidden, buried or ignored medical studies through the lens of 100 years of proven science. Matt heads up the editorial team of scientists and health researchers. Each discovery is based upon primary studies from peer reviewed science sources following the Daily Medical Discoveries 7 Step Process to ensure accuracy.
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